Written by Marissa Cox
Posted 18/01/2013
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Danish Designer Henrik Vibskov likes to do things a little differently, gaining a reputation for his mad hatter shows that mix fashion with art, usually in the form of a large-scale installation. Last season Vibskov wowed the audience with his weird and wonderful giant 'Transparent Tongue' - a huge pink inflated tube that lolled along the length of the catwalk.

For AW13 he decked out a Paris salon with upside down black flamingos that hung from the ceiling like jungle branches. And true to style, contrast played a heavy part in his designs, in the form of clashing colours, animal prints and Herringbone. Speaking to Henrik backstage after his show, he discussed the inspiration behind his AW13 collection and how music influences his designs.

District MTV: How has your aesthetic evolved from last season?

Henrik Vibskov: It's a little bit darker, we had a darker room and installation. Of course it's winter, so I try to put in some in seasonal pieces, but I'm a colourful guy, so even if it's a dark period, I cannot only do dark.

D: What inspired the installation for your AW13 collection?

HV: We've always been doing happy stuff, so we started looking into some really heavy subjects like death, and how certain cultures celebrate death in a happy way. In some they fly beautiful kites and for example in Mexico they celebrate Day of the Dead. We called it the 'Stiff Neck'. 'Stiff Neck' has a religious perspective in the Bible, there's the phrase 'Stiff Neck' in building construction - in the old days, the guys who had to carry the bricks, they were called the Stiff Neck - and sometimes it relates to being buried.

D: Last season many of your designs featured polka dots and Masai motifs. What's the idea behind the prints for AW13?

HV: The knitwear features art works and we tried to make the prints a little bit blurry, so we pixelated a lot of colours. And like the idea behind the show, the prints are also a celebration of something; New Year, maybe fireworks, but in a dark way.

D: When you're not designing you tour as a drummer for electronic musician Trentemøller. How does music influence your designs?

HV: I've been playing music since I was ten, that's actually how I got into fashion. It's a lot about social circles and how music integrates. I'm interested in the connection between music, identity and clothing.

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